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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
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Iñiqpaġmiut Iñupiat Quliaqtuaŋit

Iñupiat Urban Legends:
An Analysis of Contemporary Iñupiat Living in an
Urban Environment

A Project Presented to the Faculty
of the University of Alaska Fairbanks

In Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of

Master of Arts in Cross Cultural Studies
By
C. Sean Topkok, B.A.
Asiqłuq

June 2010

Master's Project

Abstract

The urban Iñupiat have a story to share with other Iñupiat. It is not blood quantum that defines the Alaska Native. All contemporary Iñupiat have adapted to contemporary times, whether they live in a rural community or in an urban setting. Western influence has affected all of our lives.

The analysis of contemporary Iñupiat living in an urban environment will contribute to the understanding of all Iñupiat today. The adaptations are relevant wherever the Iñupiat live. This is a fairly new research concept, since the situation of urban Iñupiat occupation is occurring more frequently nowadays. This may directly relate to other Alaska Native groups living in an urban environment.

Each Alaska Native group has their own set of Native values. The Native values help define their Native cultural heritage. How the Alaska Native people define who they are is interconnected with the Alaska Native values that the Elders have established to pass on to the future cultural bearers.

Acknowledgements

I want to thank Ronald Brower, Sr. for helping me with the proper translation for my research title. I also want to thank the Pavva Iñupiaq Dancers and the urban Iñupiat for their continued support of my research. Most importantly, quyanaqpak to my family for the inspiration, and to my late mother who instilled the importance of my family values.

 

 

 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


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Last modified July 15, 2010