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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Lingít haa sateeyí, we who are Tlingit: Contemporary Tlingit identity and the ancestral relationship to the landscape

Dissertation Defense by Vivian Martindale
March 18, 2:00 PM, Media Classroom, Rasmuson Library

Hoonah City Schools at Glacier Bay
Hoonah City Schools at Glacier Bay
  Dog Point Lingit language immersion camp
Dog Point Lingit language immersion camp

 

Video of the public defense:
http://ankn.uaf.edu/media/videos/VivianPhDDefense.mov
(45.6 MB)

Abstract
Divergent views on the Tlingit ancestral relationship to the landscape of Southeast Alaska often leads to conflicts between western-oriented government agencies, public entities, and the Tlingit people themselves. To better understand this relationship, nine personal narratives were gathered from research participants within the Tlingit nation. The narratives provide insight into the dynamics at the intersection of conflicting worldviews and the role this plays in shaping contemporary Tlingit identity. The research has illuminated three factors influencing contemporary Tlingit identity: the loss and struggle with maintaining the Lingít language, implementation of subsistence regulations and resultant conflicts, and diminishment of the ceremony called a kóo.eex’ (a memorial party). In addition, within the Tlingit worldview there are oral histories, traditional values and concepts such as balance, respect, and at.óow which define ancestral relationships and identity. These findings also reveal that the means of imparting cultural knowledge and worldviews have changed.

 

 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


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Last modified March 27, 2008