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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Yup'ik RavenMarshall Cultural Atlas

This collection of student work is from Frank Keim's classes. He has wanted to share these works for others to use as an example of Culturally-based curriculum and documentation. These documents have been OCR-scanned. These are available for educational use only.

 

 

 

 

Annie's KindergartenAnnie's KindergartenWhat's Happenin' at School?

  

Annie's Kindergarten

In Reading we are introducing the letter Ff. I have read "Who Took the Farmers Hat" to the students, and recently we made fox headbands and stand-up foxes to be used in retelling the story, "The Gingerbread Boy." The students have also been busy tracing, coloring hidden pictures with Ff, and reciting poems of "Four Little Fishes."

In Math the students are learning about groups of 1 to 4 and also the ordinal numbers to locate positions. We enjoyed the dentist's visit

recenty. Dr. Todd and our ex-student Gerilyn Fitka came into our classroon and demonstrated how fluorides are done. Afterwards they gave all of the students a ring and a toothbrush to take home.

Annie Hunter

 

 

Barb's 1st and 2nd Grades

Dear Readers,

Hi. We are working hard. We are learning how to read. We are doing art, spelling, phonics, math, English, Yup'ik and CCC. We are learning about animals and how they live. In Spanish we are learning to speak Spanish. In English we are drawing and writing about fun things. We write the stories and then we correct them and we write them again. We are learning how to use commas, periods and question marks.

We are happy that it is November because it is almost Thanksgiving. We like turkey and turkey parties. The turkey parties are so loud that they crack the earth. They are lots of fun because we eat jello, turkey, cake, and pumpkin pie with whipped cream. Sometimes we even get ice cream to eat.

Now that winter is here we are starting to use snow machines. We love the winter. We can make snowmen and snow horses. We are excited that we can also go dog racing. We all have a dog to race and we will win the dog race.

Written by the 2nd grade students.

 

 

Happy Thanksgiving from Room #103

Grades three and four are continuing to study reading, math, social studies, health, spelling, handwriting, grammar, creative writing, Spanish, art and Yupik.

Beginning Spanish language lessons are received over the school satellite dish, recorded, and watched twice weekly. Colors, numbers through ten, words describing people, and greetings have been covered so far.

A few weeks ago, Janice and Richard registered for an art class through KUC for grades four through eight. They have done drawing, water colors, graphing and tempra painting. Student art work samples were sent to Bethel for their art show. If you plan a trip to Bethel on November 18, stop at KUC and take a look!

Janice Olsen

 Happy Thanksgiving from Room #103

Tom's Class

In the 5th and 6th grades we've been learning the Spanish language and about Spanish traditions. The students made friendship bracelets and toy coffins for the Spanish holiday, Day of the Dead. They have also been watching the Young Astronauts program and have called in their answers several times. They do many experiments that the program offers.

I try to encourage the students to appreciate the foreign language that they are learning.

Tom Andrew

 

  

Richard's Classes

In Language Arts 9 and 10, students are reading Frozen Fire, by James Houston. The book involves a story of survival about Eskimos in Northern Canada. Students just finished reading a book by the same author, entitled The White Dawn, earlier in the year and reported that they enjoyed the book, so it is hoped that they will enjoy the second book as much.

In Junior High Language Arts, the students just finished reading a story about the bravery of a nine year one boy educated in France who misinterpreted a doctor's thermometer reading in Fahrenheit as Celsius which led him to believe that he was going to die. The positive note is that the students were very willing to use dictionaries to increase their vocabulary.

The High School Shop Class students are involved in individual projects ranging from gun racks to box-joint boxes made with a router and the Incra-Jig. Other students have been involved with repair of ATV's which will be of value for the remainder of their lives. It's great the see students get excited about repairing equipment that is a part of their daily lives.

The Junior-High Shop Classes are proving that hand tools can produce a worthy project. Since they are not qualified to operate power tools, they are afforded the opportunity to be creative in making projects which can be made with hand tools.

The construction workers at the new Armory building made waste material available which has produced a collection of "boxes". These boxes and "tables" are neat little projects which allow junior high students to develop a basic interest and confidence in making practical projects for their homes.

Richard Olsen

Frank's Classes 

Frank's Classes

In my Language Arts class we are reading a long novel about Siberia which not only has everyone totally engrossed but also fits in with what we are studying in World History and Russian Language class. We continue to do daily journals which are mostly thoughtful responses to readings or video news clips. And we are working in Literary Cavalcade, Choices and Update magazines as we receive them. We are just now finishing up our Fox Fire unit, Fish Fire and Water, and we should have our book out after Thanksgiving sometime. Then it's on to the short story.

In World History we are just finishing the Middle East and will begin Russian Asia next week.

Journalism includes work on this paper, plus continued effort at the big book we will entitle Building Personalities of Marshall. This is a cultural journalism project and will include photos and text about everyone who works in Marshall. The buildings where they work will also be featured. We have also been doing investigative journalism and research journalism into old magazines like Time and U.S. News and World Report. Students share their work with the rest of the class by presenting it to them in the form of speeches. Our student teacher, Flora Evan, has been a big help in this fun class.

In Russian we are studying twelve new verbs and their conjugations, plus possessive pronouns and time.

Frank Keim

 

Guy's Classes

In the 7th and 8th grade Math classes the students are doing problems with mixed numbers and improper fractions.

The 7th and 8th grade Geography students are finishing up Haiku poems and corresponding drawings dealing with the video "Nanook of the North." The high school Pre-Algebra students are exploring graphing of linear equations and applications. Algebra 1 students are learning to solve quadratic equations using the factoring method. In the Human Biology and Health class, students are preparing original drama presentations dealing with life issues.

Guy Sandlin

Special Olympics in Marshall

 

The Lower Yukon Area Special Olympics Bowling Tournament was held in Marshall November 13 through 15. The tournament was a great success and was enjoyed by all those who participated. There were five teams in attendance from Marshall, Pilot Station, Pitka's Point, Russian Mission, and St. Mary's.

The bowlers had the opportunity to bowl in three events-singles, doubles, and team bowling. Tournament medal winners were: Gold Medalist: Francine Thompson from Pitka's Point; Silver Medalist: Nick Coffee from Marshall; and Bronze Medalist: Lorah Olsen from Marshall.

In the team event, first place was awarded to Marshall, second place to Russian Mission, and third to a combination Pitka's Point/Pilot Station team. The top three doubles teams were: Emily Soolook and Henry Coffee from Marshall-first place; Faith Askoak and Stephanie Evan from Russian Mission-second place; Francine Thompson and Savanah Francis from Pitka's Point and Pilot Station-third place.

Special Olympics in Marshall
Special Olympics in Marshall
Special Olympics in Marshall
Special Olympics in Marshall
Special Olympics in Marshall
 

 

A New Volleyball Season For Alvin

Alvin Owletuck Jr has returned to coach for another season of volleyball. He has been the volleyball coach for the past three years and is at it again. He has a volleyball team of nine players and hopes they do well. He spends an hour a day scrimmaging and teaching them how to hit the ball right. Alvin had to receive first aid training just in case of an emergency.

The season started October 6, and it will end December 6. His schedule shows that he has a game in St. Mary's in two weeks and the tournament in Mountain Village in three weeks. He had a game last week in Pilot Station but did not approve of it because he had only five players on his team. Alvin says that the season has been great so far and hopes it will remain the same for the rest of the year.

Tassie Fitka

 Fish Flash

 

Fish Flash

On November 14, Marshall School received 500 little fertilized sockeye salmon eggs. These eggs were sent to the school from Ft. Richardson as part of a fish project that we have here at the school. The objective of the project is to teach students about the life cycle of the salmon.

After the eggs were received they were taken out of the box and gently released into 45 degree water in the fish tank where they will be for the next two months until they hatch. About half of the eggs were buried under the gravel. The sides were then covered with styrofoam both to keep the tank cool and to keep the aquarium dark since light can harm the new eggs.

Jonathan Boots

 

Signs of Global Warming

On November 13, Paul Coffee spotted two Swans flying over Polty's Slough going upriver. There were also two Merganser ducks spotted swimming around in an open hole at Ingerak on November 2nd by a bunch of eelers waiting for the eels to come by. This is the first time in memory that swans have been sighted in this area at this time.

Mr. Frank Keim, a teacher at Marshall school, thinks that this is a sign of global warming.

Global warming, also called the greenhouse effect, is caused by fossil fuels like gasoline and heating oil that when burned and released into the atmosphere hold in the heat that would usually be released into space. This causes the temperature all over the Earth to rise a little, and is predicted to cause dramatic changes, including the melting of the ice caps and permafrost, rise in sea levels, the extinction of thousands of animal and plant species and the flooding of cities along the world's coastlines.

Joe Fitka
Signs of Global Warming  

 

 

Editorial Page

Native Sovereignty

Charlotte Alstrom

Say No to Drugs and Alcohol

Tassie Fitka

 

Max's Message from the Best
Little School on the Yukon

 

Feature News

A Bad Year For Eeling

Jonathan Boots

Floss Your Teeth

Tatiana Sergie

Armory Nearly Finished

Maurice Turet

Brush Your Teeth!

Rose Lynn Fitka

The AFN Convention

Mary June Tinker

What's Happenin' at School?

Annie's Kindergarten

Annie Hunter

Barb's 1st and 2nd Grades

Written by the 2nd grade students.

Happy Thanksgiving from Room #103

Janice Olsen

Tom's Class

Tom Andrew

Richard's Classes

Richard Olsen

Frank's Classes

Frank Keim

Guy's Classes

Guy Sandlin

Special Olympics in Marshall

A New Volleyball Season For Alvin

Tassie Fitka

Fish Flash

Jonathan Boots

Signs of Global Warming

Joe Fitka

 

 

November 1997 Calendar

 

Elders Page

 

Taking the Wrong Trail

Alexander Isaac

 

Dedications

 

Dear Tat

 

Mystery People

 

Did You Know That…

 

Fun Page

 

Look To The Stars
Your Personal Horoscope

 

??Guess Who!!

 

Special Feature from the Tundra Drums
in memory of Veterans Day

Vietnam vet recalls the 'crazy wars'

Frank Keim

Message Page (in pdf)

 

End Notes
Christmastime Tales
Stories real and imaginary about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1996
Christmastime Tales II
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1998
Christmastime Tales III
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 2000
Summer Time Tails 1992 Summertime Tails II 1993 Summertime Tails III
Summertime Tails IV Fall, 1995 Summertime Tails V Fall, 1996 Summertime Tails VI Fall, 1997
Summertime Tails VII Fall, 1999 Signs of the Times November 1996 Creative Stories From Creative Imaginations
Mustang Mind Manglers - Stories of the Far Out, the Frightening and the Fantastic 1993 Yupik Gourmet - A Book of Recipes  
M&M Monthly    
Happy Moose Hunting! September Edition 1997 Happy Easter! March/April 1998 Merry Christmas December Edition 1997
Happy Valentine’s Day! February Edition 1998 Happy Easter! March/April Edition 2000 Happy Thanksgiving Nov. Edition, 1997
Happy Halloween October 1997 Edition Edible and Useful Plants of Scammon Bay Edible Plants of Hooper Bay 1981
The Flowers of Scammon Bay Alaska Poems of Hooper Bay Scammon Bay (Upward Bound Students)
Family Trees and the Buzzy Lord It takes a Village - A guide for parents May 1997 People in Our Community
Buildings and Personalities of Marshall Marshall Village PROFILE Qigeckalleq Pellullermeng ‘A Glimpse of the Past’
Raven’s Stories Spring 1995 Bird Stories from Scammon Bay The Sea Around Us
Ellamyua - The Great Weather - Stories about the Weather Spring 1996 Moose Fire - Stories and Poems about Moose November, 1998 Bears Bees and Bald Eagles Winter 1992-1993
Fish Fire and Water - Stories about fish, global warming and the future November, 1997 Wolf Fire - Stories and Poems about Wolves Bear Fire - Stories and Poems about Bears Spring, 1992

 

 
 

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Last modified November 7, 2006