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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Yup'ik RavenMarshall Cultural Atlas

This collection of student work is from Frank Keim's classes. He has wanted to share these works for others to use as an example of Culturally-based curriculum and documentation. These documents have been OCR-scanned. These are available for educational use only.

 

 

 

 

The Bering Sea is Ill

The Bering Sea, an immensely diverse and hugely productive system, is showing signs of stress if not outright sickness from natural and man-made causes, according to a new report from the Interior Department. Deborah Williams, Department of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt's special assistant for Alaska, says the report stems from a growing concern that rising pollution and falling populations of some fish, birds and marine mammals in the Bering Sea are biological warning signals that the system is under stress. They studied Aleutian green-winged teals and found that a quarter of their eggs had mercury levels high enough to cause deformities in laboratory chickens. The Bering Sea ecosystem is as complex and subtle as it is diverse and productive. They say that there aren't many ecosystems that are so productive and not already severely damaged. The million square mile sea is home to at least twenty-five species of marine mammals, 450 kinds of fish and shellfish, and more than fifty species of seabirds. It supports a commercial fishery worth more than $1 billion a year which is fifty-six percent of the nation's commercial catch. Many of these animal species populations are declining, including Steller sea lions, fur seals, sea otters and seabirds such as murres and kittiwakes. The winter ice pack has been steadily shrinking, shifting the ice edge, an especially productive biological zone, to the north. Persistent environmental contaminants such as PCB's, the pesticide DDT and mercury are showing up in high concentrations in the tissues of birds and mammals, including bald eagle eggs collected on the Aleutian Chain. They say whatever caused those changes, is a puzzle. A report by the National Research Council last year suggested the Bering ecosystem has been changed by causes such as commercial whaling in the 1800's, and a warming climate and commercial fishing in the past thirty years.

Tatiana Sergie
The Bering Sea is Ill

 

Our Planet is Heating Up

- Jonathan Boots

The Bering Sea is Ill

- Tatiana Sergie

Get Ready For Some Wild Weather

- Rose Lynn Fitka

More Extreme Weather Expected in The Future

- Cheryl Hunter

Severe El Niño Prediction Dismays Alaska Fisherman

- Jackie Paul George

Disease is on the Rise

- Willie Paul Fitka

Animal Habitat Continues to Vanish

- Charlotte Alstrom

 

Fishy Research Student Whoppers Parent Whoppers Elder Whoppers
Staff Whoppers Adventures Under the Sea Global Warming The Crystal Ball--Imagining how it will be

 

Christmastime Tales
Stories real and imaginary about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1996
Christmastime Tales II
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1998
Christmastime Tales III
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 2000
Summer Time Tails 1992 Summertime Tails II 1993 Summertime Tails III
Summertime Tails IV Fall, 1995 Summertime Tails V Fall, 1996 Summertime Tails VI Fall, 1997
Summertime Tails VII Fall, 1999 Signs of the Times November 1996 Creative Stories From Creative Imaginations
Mustang Mind Manglers - Stories of the Far Out, the Frightening and the Fantastic 1993 Yupik Gourmet - A Book of Recipes  
M&M Monthly    
Happy Moose Hunting! September Edition 1997 Happy Easter! March/April 1998 Merry Christmas December Edition 1997
Happy Valentine’s Day! February Edition 1998 Happy Easter! March/April Edition 2000 Happy Thanksgiving Nov. Edition, 1997
Happy Halloween October 1997 Edition Edible and Useful Plants of Scammon Bay Edible Plants of Hooper Bay 1981
The Flowers of Scammon Bay Alaska Poems of Hooper Bay Scammon Bay (Upward Bound Students)
Family Trees and the Buzzy Lord It takes a Village - A guide for parents May 1997 People in Our Community
Buildings and Personalities of Marshall Marshall Village PROFILE Qigeckalleq Pellullermeng ‘A Glimpse of the Past’
Raven’s Stories Spring 1995 Bird Stories from Scammon Bay The Sea Around Us
Ellamyua - The Great Weather - Stories about the Weather Spring 1996 Moose Fire - Stories and Poems about Moose November, 1998 Bears Bees and Bald Eagles Winter 1992-1993
Fish Fire and Water - Stories about fish, global warming and the future November, 1997 Wolf Fire - Stories and Poems about Wolves Bear Fire - Stories and Poems about Bears Spring, 1992

 

 
 

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Last modified August 22, 2006